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When politicians rig elections, it hurts voters like you.

Self-serving politicians will use many tactics to get elected and avoid being held accountable for their actions. They may add voting restrictions to make it harder for some people to vote. They may redraw their district lines to reduce competition and create “safe seats.” They may also use claims of voter fraud to challenge voters or justify changing election rules for their benefit.

All these tactics wind up hurting honest voters like you. Just ask Joe, Carol, Robert and others with compelling stories below.

JOE GOLDEN: "IF I WAS WRONGFULLY ACCUSED OF VOTER FRAUD, HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE TOO?"

Joe Golden was falsely accused of voter fraud by Gov. McCrory's reelection campaign in 2016. Joe says the experience changed the way he looks at the words 'voter fraud:' "if I can be accused of voter fraud, having done nothing wrong, it makes me wonder how many people are accused of voter fraud and had absolutely no intent, in any way, to undermine the system."

CAROL TURNER WAS FALSELY ACCUSED OF FRAUD. IT HURT.

Grandmother and military mom Carol Turner was one of hundreds of North Carolinians falsely accused of voter fraud in 2016. Carol expands on why she was so disappointed in these allegations — not only in North Carolina but with the system as a whole.

ROBERT CHADWICK: "YOU CAN'T REPRESENT THE PEOPLE OF NORTH CAROLINA BY CHEATING THE PEOPLE OF NORTH CAROLINA."

Robert Chadwick of Raleigh was falsely accused of voter fraud because his father, who voted in Maryland, has the same name. He fought back against ambitious politicians who used him to malign the 2016 elections.

PEOPLE ASSUMED JOE GOLDEN WAS A "CHEATER" WHEN HE WAS WRONGFULLY ACCUSED OF VOTER FRAUD.

Joe Golden was falsely accused of voter fraud by the Pat McCrory's reelection campaign in 2016. His name was plastered on the cover of his local papers and he was called a "cheater" on social media. Not surprisingly wrongful accusations like that soured him on the system. Now he's fighting to make it better.

Anne Hughes: I was "shocked" and "fearful."

Anne Hughes of Pinehurst and her husband Bill were both falsely accused of voter fraud by Gov. Pat McCrory's reelection campaign in 2016. She was "shocked" and "fearful" having just moved to North Carolina and finding out that her vote was being protested by someone she didn't even know.

Bill Hughes: Party Chair's Accusation Against Him Was a "Failure of Judgement."

Bill Hughes of Pinehurst and his wife Anne were both falsely accused of voter fraud in 2016 by the head of their county's Republican Party. Bill and Anne spoke out to change election rules so that it would be harder for others to be wrongfully accused of the same thing. Bill says the accusation was a "failure of judgement."

Tell Lawmakers: Stop the Scheme

Tell your legislators to stop trying to rig the system for partisan control at the expense of North Carolina's voters.